Salta al contenuto principale Salta alla mappa del sito a fondo pagina

Shrimp in Green Sauce

  • 25 minutes
  • Easy
  • Second Courses
Pair shrimp with this parsley and mint sauce for an intensely flavorful dish.
Umbria

Ingredients:

  • 2 lb shrimp
  • 2 oz parsley, freshly chopped
  • 2 oz mint
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar
  • salt and pepper
  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Preparation:

Boil the shrimp in for a couple of minutes, drain and let cool.

In the meantime, prepare the green sauce using a mortar and pestle or a blender. Grind the mint, parsley, peeled garlic cloves and vinegar. Add oil slowly as you work. Once the sauce is uniform, adjust the salt and pepper to taste.

Once the shrimp are cool, dry them and place them on individual plates. Cover them with the green sauce and serve.

Food History

Although today garlic would never be chosen for a romantic dinner because of its effect on one’s breath, in the past garlic was believed to be an extraordinary aphrodisiac. In India, where garlic was probably first cultivated thousands of years ago, monks, single women and widows were not allowed to consume garlic for fear it might cause them give into temptation. On the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, garlic has always been eaten for its flavor, but also for its medicinal qualities. In ancient Egypt, for example, garlic was prescribed for any time of pain and it was believed that it increased one’s strength. According to Herodotus, garlic was one of the main ingredients in the diet of the men who built the great pyramids of Giza.
In Europe, garlic was consumed for its antiseptic properties and in Greece it was believed to be a cure all. Pliny the Elder, the famous Roman writer who died in the 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius, wrote that garlic was used by the Roman legions to combat infections diseases.
Centuries later, during the World War II, Russian doctors gave wounded soldiers garlic instead of antibiotics, as the ancient Roman soldiers did. Thanks to the studies of Pasteur, the doctors were even more convinced of garlic’s antibacterial effect. 

Other suggested recipes