Salta al contenuto principale Salta alla mappa del sito a fondo pagina

Chicken with sage

  • Second Courses
Sage imparts its delicate and captivating aroma to this recipe for pan-cooked chicken.
Toscana

Ingredients: Per 4 servings

  • 2 lb chicken
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 10 leaves of sage
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 4 cups meat broth
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Preparation:

Trim the chicken and cut it into 8 pieces. Then, wash the meat and dry well.

Place a saute pan over medium heat. When hot, add the oil and peeled garlic. Once the garlic begins to turn golden, turn up the heat and add the chicken and sage leaves. Turn the meat so that it browns on all sides.

Once the meat has nicely browned, season with salt and pepper. Add the wine to the pan and let it evaporate completely. Finish cooking the chicken over low heat, carefully turning it from time to time and basting with the meat broth when dry.

Cook the chicken for 30 to 40 minutes or until done. Then, reduce the pan juices and remove from the pan. Serve the chicken hot in the winter and at room temperature in the summer.

Food History

Chickens probably come from Southeast Asia and were domesticated over 5,000 years ago in the north of modern day India. Initially, chickens were raised to be use for fighting. Present in ancient Egypt prior to 1000 AC, it seems as though chicken was introduced to Greece by the troops of Alexander the Great and that from Greece they spread to the rest of Europe. In Rome, chickens were raised both for the flavor of their meat and for their eggs. A number of the recipes recorded my Apicius, the famous Roman cook, as well as some written by Cato, include information on how to raise chicken. During the beginning of the Middle Ages, chicken meat lost some of its appeal, being replaced by the meat of larger animals and later by more striking birds like peacocks and pheasants.
Chicken didn’t come back into fashion until the 16th century when it appeared first on the tables of nobles and later of those of the middle class. Chicken quickly became the main ingredient of many recipes.
When people began raising animals in cages, between the 19th and 20th centuries, chicken became a food of the masses, rather than that of the rich.

Other suggested recipes