Salta al contenuto principale Salta alla mappa del sito a fondo pagina

Seadas (traditional sardinian fritter)

  • 35 minutes
  • Desserts and Fruit
This Sardinian sweet, famous throughout the world, pairs divinely the sweetness of the honey with the saltiness of the pecorino cheese, making for an intriguing and intense flavor.

Ingredients: Per 4 servings

  • 1 lb all-purpose flour
  • 3 eggs
  • 7 oz water
  • salt to taste
  • lemon zest, grated
  • honey to taste
  • 1 lb Pecorino cheese
  • 1 ¾ oz butter

Preparation:

Step 1

Make a well in the centre of the semolina, put the egg and water with salt into it and mix with the hands for at least 15 minutes.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 1

Step 2

Gradually incorporate the butter (or, if you prefer, you can substitute butter with an equal amount of lard, as called for in the traditional recipe) and continue blending until the dough is smooth and firm.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 2

Step 3

Make a ball of the dough and leave to rest for 30 minutes in the fridge.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 3

Step 4

Roll the dough to a thickness of 0.1 inch.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 4

Step 5

Cut the dough using a circular pastry cutter with a curly edge of 4 inches in diameter. Brush the circles of dough with the egg and fill them with the Sardinian sheep’s milk cheese.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 5

Step 6

Close using other disks of dough and fry them in abundant oil.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 6

Step 7

After frying, sprinkle with honey and sugar.

Sebadas (traditional sardinian fritter) - step 7

Chef's tips

In order to keep the seadas from opening and loosing their filling during cooking, seal the edges well by brushing one of the two disks with egg white. Fry in a generous amount of oil and drain off any excess oil from the fritter.

Food History

The Seadas, also called Sebadas, are one of the most famous Sardinian desserts. Originally considered a second course, they are a typical dish of sheepherding communities. In the past, in fact, women would dress up and serve them to their husbands when in spring then would return home with their sheep after the long period spent out in the Sardinian pastures.

Did you know that...

The name “Seadas” comes from the Sardianian word seu, an animal fat used to make candles, referring to the shininess of the fritters coming from the honey and sugar?

Other suggested recipes