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Three Chocolate Mousse

  • 8 hours
  • Difficult
  • Desserts and Fruit
Three types of chocolate mousse come together to make a creamy and flavorful treat, ideal for parties and special occasions.

Ingredients: Per 4 servings

  • 1 lb heavy cream
  • 11 oz white chocolate
  • ½ oz gelatin sheets
  • 1 lb heavy cream
  • ½ lb milk chocolate
  • ½ oz gelatin sheets
  • 1 ½ lb heavy cream
  • 1 lb dark chocolate
  • ½ oz gelatin sheets
  • 10 oz dark chocolate

Preparation:

Begin by preparing the mousses, one by one.

White Chocolate Mousse

Soften the gelatin sheets in the hot water for a minute or so. Melt the chocolate in a bain marie until it is between 100°- 110° F. Then add the gelatin to the chocolate. In the meanwhile, bring ¾ cup cream to a boil, then immediately remove from the heat. Stir in the chocolate and gelatin mixture, which you have kept at a constant temperature.

With a whisk, beat the remaining ¾ cup cream until if forms soft peaks. Wait until the chocolate mixture has cooled to 80° F, then add the whipped cream to the mixture. If the chocolate is too hot, the whipped cream has a tendency to melt.

Transfer the mouse to a mold and let cool in the refrigerator for an hour and a half. In the meanwhile, prepare the next mousse.

Milk Chocolate Mousse

Soften the gelatin sheets in the hot water for a minute or so. Melt the chocolate in a bain marie until it is between 100°- 110° F. Then add the gelatin to the chocolate. In the meanwhile, bring 1 cup cream to a boil, then immediately remove from the heat. Stir in the chocolate and gelatin mixture, which you have kept at a constant temperature.

With a whisk, beat the remaining ¾ cup cream until if forms soft peaks. Wait until the chocolate mixture has cooled to 80° F, then add the whipped cream to the mixture. If the chocolate is too hot, the whipped cream has a tendency to melt.

Then pour the mousse into the mold containing the previous mousse. Return to the refrigerator for and hour and a half so that the second mousse can set. In the meantime, prepare the third mousse.

Dark Chocolate Mousse

Soften the gelatin sheets in the hot water for a minute or so. Melt the chocolate in a bain marie until it is between 100°- 110° F. Then add the gelatin to the chocolate. In the meanwhile, bring 1 ½ cups cream to a boil, then immediately remove from the heat. Stir in the chocolate and gelatin mixture, which you have kept at a constant temperature.

With a whisk, beat the remaining 1 ¼ cups cream until if forms soft peaks. Wait until the chocolate mixture has cooled to 80° F, then add the whipped cream to the mixture. If the chocolate is too hot, the whipped cream has a tendency to melt.

When ready, pour the dark chocolate mousse into the mold containing the other two mousses, forming three layers. Keep the mold in the refrigerator for at least three hours to set. Before serving, melt ¾ cups dark chocolate in a bain marie and pour over the mousse once the chocolate has reached 75°F.

Garnish the mousse to your liking and serve.

Food History

Originally from South America, the cocoa tree is known scientifically as “theobroma cacao,” a name given to the tree in 1735 by Swedish botanist, Carl Linnaeus, which means good of the Gods in Greek. Although this name may seem excessive, it derives from an ancient Aztec legend supporting the notion that the cocoa tree was a gift to men from the god Quetzalcòatl.
When the Spanish arrived in the New World, they discovered that the native populations not only considered cocoa to be a sacred drink worthy only of nobles and priests, but they believed that cocoa beans were so precious that they were used as coins. In fact, the best beans in terms of quality and size were so valuable that, according to records of the first European explorers, 10 beans could be used to buy a rabbit.
Chocolate, in the form of cocoa, was introduced to Europe by Cortés, but initially, the bitter cocoa beverage prepared in the Aztec style was not a big hit. Only around the 17th century did Europeans begin to sweeten the cocoa by adding sugar and vanilla. Chocolate first began to spread across Spain and then to the rest of Europe, where it became a very trendy beverage.

Did you know that...

According to historians, Montezuma, the Aztec emperor, used to drink 40 cups of hot chocolate per day without ever drinking twice from the same cup?

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